Proceedings Of The Marine

FAL 2012

Proceedings magazine is a communication tool for the Coast Guard's Marine Safety & Security Council. Each quarterly magazine focuses on a specific theme of interest to the marine industry.

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Overview of Reportable Marine Casualties, from 2006 to 2011 Marine Casualty Statistics Injury Severity Scale Minor The injury is minor or superficial. No professional medical treatment was required. Examples: Minor/superficial scrapes (abrasions); minor bruises; minor cuts; digit sprain; first degree burn; minor head trauma with headache or dizziness; minor sprain/strain. Moderate The injury exceeds the minor level, but did not result in broken bones (other than fingers, toes or nose), loss of limbs, severe hemorrhaging, muscle, nerve, tendon or internal organ damage. Professional medical treatment may have been required. If so, the person was not hospitalized for more than 48 hours within 5 days of the injury. Examples: Broken fingers, toes or nose; amputated fingers or toes; degloving of fingers or toes; dislocated joint; severe sprain/strain; second/third degree burns covering 10% or less of body (if face included, move up one category); herniated disc. Serious The injury exceeds the moderate level and requires significant medical/surgical management. The person was not hospitalized for more than 48 hours within 5 days of the injury. Top Initial Casualty Events for 2006 to 2011 Examples: Broken bones (other than fingers, toes or nose); partial loss of limb (amputation below elbow/ knee); degloving of entire hand/arm or foot/leg; second/third degree burns covering 20-30% of body (if face included, move up one category); bruised organs. Severe The injury exceeds the moderate level and requires significant medical/surgical management. The person was hospitalized for more than 48 hours within 5 days of the injury and, if in intensive care, was in for less than 48 hours. Examples: Internal hemorrhage; punctured organs; severed blood vessels; second/third degree burns covering 30-40% of body (if face included, move up one category); loss of limb (amputation of whole arm/leg). Critical The injury exceeds the severe level and requires significant medical/surgical management. The person was hospitalized and intensive care for more than 48 hours within 5 days of the injury. Examples: Spinal cord injury; extensive second or third degree burns; concussion with severe neurological signs; severe crushing injury; internal hemorrhage; second/third degree burns covering 40% or more of body; severe/multiple organ damage. Top initial casualty events for 2006 to 2011. Material failure (of systems, components, materials, and related equipment) is the most common initial event. 64 Proceedings Fall 2012 www.uscg.mil/proceedings

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